Southend Family Carers Survey 2020 – Key Findings Summary

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Summary

Family carers support family and friends who need extra help because of illness or disability. Family carers play an important and sometimes difficult role. To help them, Southend-on-Sea Borough Council (SBC) pay a local charity to deliver support and information for carers.

To make sure the support and information is what carers want and need, we asked carers, their friends and family some questions. We asked carers questions that will help us to understand if there is anything we could be doing differently or better to support family carers.

How we asked the questions

The survey (how we asked the questions) was available online. Paper copies of the survey were available but were not used very much. We could not ask people the questions face to face because of coronavirus and the lockdown. The survey was available online from the 24 February 2020 to the 21 June 2020. 204 people did the survey. The survey was advertised online, through websites, social media, through various voluntary and community organisations, SBC, Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and through service teams.


Who do carers provide care for and for how long?

  • most of the people who did the survey had been caring for over one year but less than three years (23%). Closely followed by people who had been caring for over five years but less than 10 years (21%)


  • many people who responded to the survey spent 100 hours or more per week looking after or helping the person/people they care for (24%)


  • most people cared for people over the age of 80 (35%)


  • the main condition of the primary person people care for is dementia (34), followed by Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (26)


Carers Views and Experiences - Key findings

Chart to show 56% Can access information, advice, and guidance they need to support them in their caring role


We asked the open-ended question: What has been your experience of accessing help and support to look after your own physical health, emotional wellbeing, and mental health?

Of the many answers, the top 10 themes identified were:

Table 1


Theme

Number of Respondents

Not accessed any support

35

Terrible experience of accessing support

28

Did not know there is support available/ there is very little available

20

Support is available when needed

20

Accessed counselling at Carers Hub

6

Support from family and friends

5

Supported by an individual professional (GP)

4

Would like more respite

4

Do not have the time to access support for me

3

Support available does not cater for people who work and care

3


Carers health has been negatively affected by their caring role. In the past 12 months people who answered our survey said:

  • 85% feel tired
  • 80% general feelings of stress
  • 67% disturbed sleep
  • 66% disturbed sleep
  • 59% feel depressed
  • 50% are short tempered / irritable
  • 40% physical strain (e.g. back)
  • 35% had to see their GP
  • 30% made existing conditions worse
  • 24% developed health condition
  • 18% loss of appetite


Who Answered the Questions?

People who answered the questions in the survey could share extra information about themselves.

  • 91% were from white, English, Welsh, Scottish or Northern Irish ethnicity
  • 71% were female


Chart 1


The vertical bar chart shows the age of people who answered the questions in the survey. The data shows that most people who answered the questions were between the ages of 50-59 years. No one between the ages of 18-24 answered the questions. The data values are as follows: under 18 years old 2.74%, 18-24 year 0%, 25-39 years 14.38%, 40-49 years 12.33%, 50-59 years 34.25%, 60-69 years 23.97%, 70-79 years 6.85%, 80+ 4.79% and 0.68% of people preferred not to say.


Chart 2:


The pie chart shows the sexual orientation of people who answered the survey. Most people identified as heterosexual/straight, no one was gay or lesbian sexual orientation. 87% of people who answered the survey are heterosexual/straight, 8% preferred not to tell us and 5% are bisexual.


When we compare the people, who answered the survey to all the carers in Southend on Sea, there was low engagement from some groups of carers. We need to do more to listen to carers who are:

  • male
  • do not describe themselves as male or female
  • carers aged between 18-24 and 40-49
  • people who do not identify as white or English, Welsh, Scottish, Northern Irish
  • LGBT+ (although note that we got a good representation from people who are bisexual)
  • self-employed
  • those in full time education
  • unemployed


Next Steps

The answers to the questions show us that carers in Southend on Sea face many challenges but want different types of support to help them in their caring role. There is not going to be one type of support that helps all carers so we must make sure there are different and flexible things available in Southend.

By the end of November 2020, we will have a plan of how we are going to improve support for carers in Southend for the next 18 months. The answers to these questions will help make this plan. The survey will also be used to help us inform what new services we pay for will look like when we buy new carers support services in the new year.

A full report on the survey is also available, if you would be interested in receiving a copy of the report please contact integratedcommissioning@southend.gov.uk to request a copy of the Southend Family Carers Survey – Full Report.



Southend Carers Professional Survey


2020 – Key Findings Summary

Introduction

Family carers support family and friends who need extra help because of illness or disability. Family carers play an important and sometimes difficult role. To help them, Southend-On-Sea Borough Council (SBC) pay a local charity to deliver support and information for carers.

To make sure the support and information is what carers want and need, we asked people who work with carers some questions. We asked questions that will help us to understand if there is anything we could be doing differently or better to support family carers.

How we asked the questions

The survey (how we asked the question) was available online. The survey was available online from the 4 May 2020 and closed 21 June 2020. 89 professionals (people who work with carers) responded to the survey.

Who answered the questions?

Lots of different professionals answered the questions. Most people who answered the questions worked in social care.


Table 1: The type of jobs people do

Occupation/department/Service

Number of responders

Adult social care

33

Social care

13

Third sector carers specific support services

5

Hospital social worker

4

Occupational therapist

4

Social prescribing link worker

3

Department of People SBC

2

EPUT

2

Hospice

2

Education

1

Manager

1

Third sector not carer specific

1

Young Carers worker

1


Key Findings

The top five services professionals find the most useful for carers in Southend-on-Sea:

  • Benefit and financial advice - 58 responses
  • Carers emergency respite scheme - 57 responses
  • Dementia Community Support Team - 51 responses
  • Information, advice and guidance from Carers Hub - 50 responses
  • Ad hoc respite - 48 responses


Chart 1: Gaps and barriers to providing support for carers

The horizontal bar chart shows what professionals think is a gap or barrier to support. Most professionals (55) think having a clear understanding of who does what is a gap or barriers and only six professionals think there are no gaps or barriers.

Data Table for Chart 1

Gap or barrier

Number of professionals

Accessing information on relevant support

30

Having a clear understanding of who does what

55

Not identifying carers early enough

30

Personalisation/personal budgets

30

Referral pathways to accessing services (community, GP, health)

34

Sharing of information between organisations

34

There are no gaps or barriers

6

Other

5


Chart 2: Top five support professionals would like to see more of for carers

The horizontal bar graph shows the top five support professionals would like to see more of to support carers. Most professionals want to see more opportunities for carers to take a break during the day (43), 41 would like to see more opportunities for carers to take a break overnight, 30 professionals would like more direct payment so carers can chose their own support, 30 professionals would also like to see more practical support for carers and 26 would like more opportunities for carers to do activities with their cared for.

Data Table for Chart 2

Support

Number of responses

More opportunities for carers to do activities with their cared for

26

Practical support for carers (e.g. help around the house, garden, meal deliveries)

28

Direct payment for carers can chose their own support

30

Opportunities for carers to take a break/respite (overnight)

41

Opportunities for carers to take a break/respite (daytime)

43


Chart 3: Carers Assessments

The vertical bar chart shows what professionals think will make carers assessments more easily available. Most professionals thought that allowing carers to complete self-assessments online would make carers assessments more accessible (41), 31 professionals think an app on a mobile devise for professionals to use to complete assessments will make them more accessible, 31 professionals also think shared responsibility with the third sector doing lower level assessment and social care doing joint and higher level assessment will make them more accessible, 29 professionals think telephone carers assessments will make them more accessible, 30 think a variety of professional undertaking carers assessments will make them more accessible and 21 professionals think the third sector doing all carers assessments will make them more accessible.

Data Table for Chart 3

Accessibility

Number of responses

Allow carers to complete self-assessment online

41

Mobile app for professionals to use to complete assessments

31

Shared responsibility between third sector and social care.

31

Telephone careers assessments

29

Variety of professional able to undertake assessments

28

Third sector do all carers assessments

21


Chart 4: Early Identification of Carers

The horizontal bar graph shows how what professionals think will help increase the early identification of carers. Most professionals (19) think raising the profile of carers in the community will increase early identification, 15 think identifying carers at the point of contact/referral of someone with a care and support need will increase early identification, 10 think sharing of information amongst professionals, eight a recognized definition of carer, 6 think communication and information for carers throughout their caring journey, five think increased available of carers assessment, four presence in community setting, two easy access referral system and two education about the role and response for the role of carers.

Data Table for Chart 4

Early Identification

Number of responses

Education

2

Early access to the referral system

2

Presence in the community setting

4

Increased availability of carers assessments

5

Communication and information

6

A recognised definition of carer

8

Sharing information amongst professionals

10

At point of contact/referral of someone with care and support needs

15

Raising the profile of carers in the community

19


Chart 5: Personalisation

The horizontal bar graph shows what professionals think would increase personalisation for carers. This was a free text answer, and the following themes were identified. Most professionals think have better conversation with carers and improved carers assessments would increase personalisation (17 professionals chose these options), 16 think autonomy for carers to decide what support is best for them, 15 think promoting choice, five think having a single person to contact and two think flexible respite budgets.

Data Table for Chart 5

Increase Personalisation

Number of responses

Flexible respite budgets

2

Single person to contact – build trust

5

Promoting choice

15

Autonomy

16

Improved carers assessments

17

Have better conversations with carers

17


Next Steps

The expertise shared by professionals highlight the importance of good communication – with carers and between professionals. Speaking and listening to each other will improve how professionals work with carers which will improve carers experiences and their personal journey. Regular opportunities for carers to rest and take a break from their caring is clearly a priority for professionals. Raising the profile of carers across the community, improving people’s understanding and respect for the role of being a carer is also an area we must improve on.

By the end of November 2020, we will have a plan of how we are going to support carers in Southend. The answers to these questions will help make this plan. The survey will also be used to help us inform what any new services we pay for will look like when we buy new carers support services in the new year.

A full report on the survey is also available, if you would be interested in receiving a copy of the report please contact integratedcommissioning@southend.gov.uk to request a copy of the Southend Carer Professional Survey – Full Report.

Summary

Family carers support family and friends who need extra help because of illness or disability. Family carers play an important and sometimes difficult role. To help them, Southend-on-Sea Borough Council (SBC) pay a local charity to deliver support and information for carers.

To make sure the support and information is what carers want and need, we asked carers, their friends and family some questions. We asked carers questions that will help us to understand if there is anything we could be doing differently or better to support family carers.

How we asked the questions

The survey (how we asked the questions) was available online. Paper copies of the survey were available but were not used very much. We could not ask people the questions face to face because of coronavirus and the lockdown. The survey was available online from the 24 February 2020 to the 21 June 2020. 204 people did the survey. The survey was advertised online, through websites, social media, through various voluntary and community organisations, SBC, Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and through service teams.


Who do carers provide care for and for how long?

  • most of the people who did the survey had been caring for over one year but less than three years (23%). Closely followed by people who had been caring for over five years but less than 10 years (21%)


  • many people who responded to the survey spent 100 hours or more per week looking after or helping the person/people they care for (24%)


  • most people cared for people over the age of 80 (35%)


  • the main condition of the primary person people care for is dementia (34), followed by Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (26)


Carers Views and Experiences - Key findings

Chart to show 56% Can access information, advice, and guidance they need to support them in their caring role


We asked the open-ended question: What has been your experience of accessing help and support to look after your own physical health, emotional wellbeing, and mental health?

Of the many answers, the top 10 themes identified were:

Table 1


Theme

Number of Respondents

Not accessed any support

35

Terrible experience of accessing support

28

Did not know there is support available/ there is very little available

20

Support is available when needed

20

Accessed counselling at Carers Hub

6

Support from family and friends

5

Supported by an individual professional (GP)

4

Would like more respite

4

Do not have the time to access support for me

3

Support available does not cater for people who work and care

3


Carers health has been negatively affected by their caring role. In the past 12 months people who answered our survey said:

  • 85% feel tired
  • 80% general feelings of stress
  • 67% disturbed sleep
  • 66% disturbed sleep
  • 59% feel depressed
  • 50% are short tempered / irritable
  • 40% physical strain (e.g. back)
  • 35% had to see their GP
  • 30% made existing conditions worse
  • 24% developed health condition
  • 18% loss of appetite


Who Answered the Questions?

People who answered the questions in the survey could share extra information about themselves.

  • 91% were from white, English, Welsh, Scottish or Northern Irish ethnicity
  • 71% were female


Chart 1


The vertical bar chart shows the age of people who answered the questions in the survey. The data shows that most people who answered the questions were between the ages of 50-59 years. No one between the ages of 18-24 answered the questions. The data values are as follows: under 18 years old 2.74%, 18-24 year 0%, 25-39 years 14.38%, 40-49 years 12.33%, 50-59 years 34.25%, 60-69 years 23.97%, 70-79 years 6.85%, 80+ 4.79% and 0.68% of people preferred not to say.


Chart 2:


The pie chart shows the sexual orientation of people who answered the survey. Most people identified as heterosexual/straight, no one was gay or lesbian sexual orientation. 87% of people who answered the survey are heterosexual/straight, 8% preferred not to tell us and 5% are bisexual.


When we compare the people, who answered the survey to all the carers in Southend on Sea, there was low engagement from some groups of carers. We need to do more to listen to carers who are:

  • male
  • do not describe themselves as male or female
  • carers aged between 18-24 and 40-49
  • people who do not identify as white or English, Welsh, Scottish, Northern Irish
  • LGBT+ (although note that we got a good representation from people who are bisexual)
  • self-employed
  • those in full time education
  • unemployed


Next Steps

The answers to the questions show us that carers in Southend on Sea face many challenges but want different types of support to help them in their caring role. There is not going to be one type of support that helps all carers so we must make sure there are different and flexible things available in Southend.

By the end of November 2020, we will have a plan of how we are going to improve support for carers in Southend for the next 18 months. The answers to these questions will help make this plan. The survey will also be used to help us inform what new services we pay for will look like when we buy new carers support services in the new year.

A full report on the survey is also available, if you would be interested in receiving a copy of the report please contact integratedcommissioning@southend.gov.uk to request a copy of the Southend Family Carers Survey – Full Report.



Southend Carers Professional Survey


2020 – Key Findings Summary

Introduction

Family carers support family and friends who need extra help because of illness or disability. Family carers play an important and sometimes difficult role. To help them, Southend-On-Sea Borough Council (SBC) pay a local charity to deliver support and information for carers.

To make sure the support and information is what carers want and need, we asked people who work with carers some questions. We asked questions that will help us to understand if there is anything we could be doing differently or better to support family carers.

How we asked the questions

The survey (how we asked the question) was available online. The survey was available online from the 4 May 2020 and closed 21 June 2020. 89 professionals (people who work with carers) responded to the survey.

Who answered the questions?

Lots of different professionals answered the questions. Most people who answered the questions worked in social care.


Table 1: The type of jobs people do

Occupation/department/Service

Number of responders

Adult social care

33

Social care

13

Third sector carers specific support services

5

Hospital social worker

4

Occupational therapist

4

Social prescribing link worker

3

Department of People SBC

2

EPUT

2

Hospice

2

Education

1

Manager

1

Third sector not carer specific

1

Young Carers worker

1


Key Findings

The top five services professionals find the most useful for carers in Southend-on-Sea:

  • Benefit and financial advice - 58 responses
  • Carers emergency respite scheme - 57 responses
  • Dementia Community Support Team - 51 responses
  • Information, advice and guidance from Carers Hub - 50 responses
  • Ad hoc respite - 48 responses


Chart 1: Gaps and barriers to providing support for carers

The horizontal bar chart shows what professionals think is a gap or barrier to support. Most professionals (55) think having a clear understanding of who does what is a gap or barriers and only six professionals think there are no gaps or barriers.

Data Table for Chart 1

Gap or barrier

Number of professionals

Accessing information on relevant support

30

Having a clear understanding of who does what

55

Not identifying carers early enough

30

Personalisation/personal budgets

30

Referral pathways to accessing services (community, GP, health)

34

Sharing of information between organisations

34

There are no gaps or barriers

6

Other

5


Chart 2: Top five support professionals would like to see more of for carers

The horizontal bar graph shows the top five support professionals would like to see more of to support carers. Most professionals want to see more opportunities for carers to take a break during the day (43), 41 would like to see more opportunities for carers to take a break overnight, 30 professionals would like more direct payment so carers can chose their own support, 30 professionals would also like to see more practical support for carers and 26 would like more opportunities for carers to do activities with their cared for.

Data Table for Chart 2

Support

Number of responses

More opportunities for carers to do activities with their cared for

26

Practical support for carers (e.g. help around the house, garden, meal deliveries)

28

Direct payment for carers can chose their own support

30

Opportunities for carers to take a break/respite (overnight)

41

Opportunities for carers to take a break/respite (daytime)

43


Chart 3: Carers Assessments

The vertical bar chart shows what professionals think will make carers assessments more easily available. Most professionals thought that allowing carers to complete self-assessments online would make carers assessments more accessible (41), 31 professionals think an app on a mobile devise for professionals to use to complete assessments will make them more accessible, 31 professionals also think shared responsibility with the third sector doing lower level assessment and social care doing joint and higher level assessment will make them more accessible, 29 professionals think telephone carers assessments will make them more accessible, 30 think a variety of professional undertaking carers assessments will make them more accessible and 21 professionals think the third sector doing all carers assessments will make them more accessible.

Data Table for Chart 3

Accessibility

Number of responses

Allow carers to complete self-assessment online

41

Mobile app for professionals to use to complete assessments

31

Shared responsibility between third sector and social care.

31

Telephone careers assessments

29

Variety of professional able to undertake assessments

28

Third sector do all carers assessments

21


Chart 4: Early Identification of Carers

The horizontal bar graph shows how what professionals think will help increase the early identification of carers. Most professionals (19) think raising the profile of carers in the community will increase early identification, 15 think identifying carers at the point of contact/referral of someone with a care and support need will increase early identification, 10 think sharing of information amongst professionals, eight a recognized definition of carer, 6 think communication and information for carers throughout their caring journey, five think increased available of carers assessment, four presence in community setting, two easy access referral system and two education about the role and response for the role of carers.

Data Table for Chart 4

Early Identification

Number of responses

Education

2

Early access to the referral system

2

Presence in the community setting

4

Increased availability of carers assessments

5

Communication and information

6

A recognised definition of carer

8

Sharing information amongst professionals

10

At point of contact/referral of someone with care and support needs

15

Raising the profile of carers in the community

19


Chart 5: Personalisation

The horizontal bar graph shows what professionals think would increase personalisation for carers. This was a free text answer, and the following themes were identified. Most professionals think have better conversation with carers and improved carers assessments would increase personalisation (17 professionals chose these options), 16 think autonomy for carers to decide what support is best for them, 15 think promoting choice, five think having a single person to contact and two think flexible respite budgets.

Data Table for Chart 5

Increase Personalisation

Number of responses

Flexible respite budgets

2

Single person to contact – build trust

5

Promoting choice

15

Autonomy

16

Improved carers assessments

17

Have better conversations with carers

17


Next Steps

The expertise shared by professionals highlight the importance of good communication – with carers and between professionals. Speaking and listening to each other will improve how professionals work with carers which will improve carers experiences and their personal journey. Regular opportunities for carers to rest and take a break from their caring is clearly a priority for professionals. Raising the profile of carers across the community, improving people’s understanding and respect for the role of being a carer is also an area we must improve on.

By the end of November 2020, we will have a plan of how we are going to support carers in Southend. The answers to these questions will help make this plan. The survey will also be used to help us inform what any new services we pay for will look like when we buy new carers support services in the new year.

A full report on the survey is also available, if you would be interested in receiving a copy of the report please contact integratedcommissioning@southend.gov.uk to request a copy of the Southend Carer Professional Survey – Full Report.